The most important questions and answers about pain therapy at a glance

On this portal you will find a list of the most important questions and answerson the topic of pain therapy.

We, a team of doctors and patients, are constantly asking more questions and answers.

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In which preparations is diclofenac included?

diclofenacWhen the analgesic diclofenac was launched on the market in 1973, everything was still very clear: the drug was called Voltaren®, and that's it.

But when the patent expired, the market was flooded and today you get Diclofenac from almost every manufacturer. It is just about a "big market", where many want to earn. The good side of it is that many providers always lower the price.

Read more: In which preparations is diclofenac included?

   

When taking Capros and other morphine supplements, avoid allergy

Current doctor tip

Morphine preparations (e.g., Capros®, Painbreak®, M-dolor®, Morphine hexal® o.a.) are very effective drugs for severe pain. Possible unpleasant side effects may include constipation, dry mouth or urinary disorders.

Read more: Avoid taking allergy medications when taking Capros and other morphine supplements

   

What you should keep in mind when taking Novalgin

Current doctor tip

If your doctor tells you Novalgin® or another analgesic with the active ingredient metamizole (e.g., Analgin®, Berlosin®, Novaminsulfone®), you should know the following:

Metamizole is widely used and, in most cases, well tolerated. The reason why it is still prescribed with caution by some doctors, however, lies in two possible, but very rare but dangerous side effects: the risk of shock (sudden circulatory failure) and a strong reduction of certain white blood cells (agranulocytosis).

Read more: What you should keep in mind when taking Novalgin

   

What side effects may occur with diclofenac?

Like (almost) any other drug, diclofenac can also cause side effects. The emphasis is on "can", because not every one of them occurs. Nevertheless, it is important to know about it in order to be able to take countermeasures if necessary.

Read more: What are the side effects of taking diclofenac?

   

Which active substance contains Voltaren®?

Voltaren® contains the active substance diclofenac. Manufacturer is Novartis. Meanwhile, there are Diclofenac but also under umpteen other trade names.

Read more: Which active substance contains Voltaren®?

   

In what way does diclofenac have an analgesic effect?

Diclofenac is one of the so-called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). As far as the mechanism of action is concerned, it is relatively closely related to acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin® and others) and ibuprofen, which are also NSAIDs.

Read more: In what way does diclofenac have a pain-relieving effect?

   

What kind of pain medication is naproxen?

Naproxen belongs to the group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and thus to the same group as ibuprofen and diclofenac. While naproxen, e.g. is very popular in the USA, it is used less frequently in this country than e.g. Ibuprofen.

Read more: What kind of pain medication is naproxen?

   

What is so special about the ibuprofen preparation Dolormin®?

Dolormin®but also other ibuprofen preparations, e.g. IBU-ratiopharm® Lysinate contain the painkiller as lysinate. This is a salt of ibuprofen and the amino acid lysine.

Read more: What is special about the ibuprofen preparation Dolormin®?

   

Is it true that ibuprofen and diclofenac may affect a high blood pressure treatment?

Yes. The concomitant use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac and ibuprofen can be administered e.g. reduce the hypotensive effect of ACE inhibitors. ACE inhibitors are one of the many active ingredient groups against high blood pressure.

Read more: Is it true that ibuprofen and diclofenac may affect a high blood pressure treatment?

   

What alternative methods of pain relief are there?

There are a number of pain-relieving methods outside the common pain medications. These include, for example, breathing and relaxation exercises, meditation and cognitive strategies. In addition, procedures such as massages, acupuncture or (foot) reflexology can be helpful.

Read more: What alternative methods of pain relief are there?

   

What are the side effects of taking acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)?

The most common side effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) are the gastrointestinal tract. Nausea, vomiting, heartburn and, on the stomach wall, mucosal irritation, bleeding or even gastric ulcers may occur following ASA treatment.

Read more: What side effects can occur when taking acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)?

   

How does acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) have an analgesic effect?

Acetylsalicylic acid (abbreviation: ASA) exerts its analgesic effect by inhibiting the body's own enzymes cyclooxygenase I and II. These enzymes are involved in the production of prostaglandins. And prostaglandins in turn are the main pain messengers.

Read more: In what way does acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) have an analgesic effect?

   

Is it allowed to drive while taking strong opioids (morphine, fentanyl, etc.)?

Reactivity may be compromised when treated with stronger opioids. For a long time there was a strict car driving ban with taking morphine, fentanyl and other strong opioids.

Read more: Is it still possible to drive while taking strong opioids (morphine, fentanyl, etc.)?

   

How can withdrawal symptoms be avoided when stopping treatment with opioids (morphine, etc.)?

If pain treatment with opioids (morphine & Co) is discontinued or the dose is reduced, it must be controlled and under medical supervision. Controlled means above all that the dose reduction is performed slowly and gradually, so that the body slowly gets used to it. In this way, it is often possible to keep withdrawal symptoms within tolerable limits.

Read more: How to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping treatment with opioids (morphine etc.)?

   

Do Opioids (Morphine, Fentanyl etc.) Depend on?

The official doctrine is no. At least not in the sense that the e.g. Heroin is the case, which chemically also belongs to the opiates. Seizures, that is, the insatiable desire for "the next kick", as soon as the effect of the last dose wears off, there is no intake of opioids in the treatment of pain.

Read more: Do Opioids (Morphine, Fentanyl etc.) Depend on?

   

How can an overdose of opioids (morphine etc.) be expressed?

Excessive doses of opioids usually cause dizziness and dizziness. The reactivity can also be significantly slowed down. Even if the dose is increased too fast, these side effects may occur.

Read more: How can an overdose of opioids (morphine etc.) be expressed?

   

How fast can you reduce the dosage of opioids (morphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, methadone)?

If pain treatment with opioids is discontinued or if the dose is to be reduced significantly, this must be done gradually and under medical supervision to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

Read more: At what speed is it possible to reduce the dosage of opioids (morphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, methadone)?

   

What role do prostaglandins play in the onset of pain?

The body's own prostaglandins are one of the key messengers in the development of pain. In case of injury or other physical damage, they are increasingly distributed at the scene of action.

Read more: What role do prostaglandins play in the onset of pain?

   

What side effects can occur with highly effective opioids?

High potency opioids include morphine, fentanyl, buprenorphine, oxycodone and hydromorphone. Dizziness, nausea and vomiting may occur at the beginning of treatment. As a rule, this can be easily managed by only slowly increasing the dose and by administering accompanying medications.

Read more: What side effects can occur with highly effective opioids?