Worth knowing about the medicinal rheumatic therapy

Which rheumatism drug is best in which situation? Ibuprofen or Diclofenac? Methotrexate or cortisone? Or one of the newer ones like Infliximab? Basic questions about drug-based rheumatism therapy are covered in this chapter.

What are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)?

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are painkillers with an anti-inflammatory component. That is why they are often used in rheumatism. Formally, they are distinguished from the also anti-inflammatory acting steroids (cortisone), hence their name.

Read more: What are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)?

   

Is it possible to treat rheumatism with aspirin (ASA)?

You can, but it would be wrong. Although acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, e.g., aspirin®) quite relieve rheumatic complaints. However, quite high doses (500-1,000 mg daily) are required and this can strike the stomach after only a few days. In the long term, this can cause stomach ulcers or severe gastric bleeding.

Read more: Is it possible to treat rheumatism with aspirin (ASA)?

   

Can rheumatic drugs such as ASA, diclofenac or ibuprofen cure the condition?

No, they can not. But that can not be another rheumatism drug. Painkillers from the group of "non-steroidal anti-rheumatics" (short: NSAIDs, such as: acetylsalicylic acid, diclofenac, ibuprofen) relieve not only the joint pain, but also the inflammatory stimulus.

Read more: Can rheumatic drugs such as ASA, diclofenac or ibuprofen cure the disease?

   

Can you also combine different over-the-counter rheumatic painkillers?

No, you should not do that. Because normally you can not achieve a better effect. But it probably increases the risk of side effects. For this reason, combination preparations (two or even more different active ingredients in one tablet) are not recommended.

Read more: Can you also combine different over-the-counter rheumatic painkillers?

   

Rheumatism drugs: Before eating, during the meal or after eating?

The right time to take medication is important, not only for its effectiveness, but also for its compatibility.

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What does "retard" mean for a rheumatism drug?

"Retard" literally means delay or delay. When a drug is given the additional name "retard", it always means that it is a drug that releases the drug more slowly than normal in the body.

Read more: What does the term "retard" mean for a rheumatism drug?

   

Do you get used to prolonged use of NSAIDs (aspirin, aspirin, ibuprofen, diclofenac)?

No. Unlike some other analgesics, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen) have no habituation effect.

Read more: Are you used to prolonged use of NSAIDs (aspirin, aspirin, ibuprofen, diclofenac)?

   

What can I do to better tolerate the rheumatism medication?

Often, the type of intake can help to better tolerate medication. Take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, diclofenac, etc.) at the end of the meal, which is gentle on the stomach.

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Are the rheumatoid drugs ibuprofen, diclofenac or naproxen more stomach-friendly when taken as a suppository?

No. The possibility of gastric intolerance of NSAIDs (NSAIDs = non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, aspirin, aspirin®) is independent of the mode of administration.

Read more: Are the rheumatism drugs ibuprofen, diclofenac or naproxen easier on the stomach when taken as a suppository?