vitamins

Here you will find questions and answers about vitamins. From their effect to the food you need for it. And, of course, on the subject of vitamin supplements, which sometimes make perfect sense.

How many types of Vitamin B are there and what is their name?

One distinguishes between eight different B vitamins. These eight B vitamins are also summarized under the collective term "vitamin B complex" or simply as vitamin B.

Read more: How many types of vitamin B are there and what are their names?

   

What do you need Vitamin B for?

B vitamins fulfill a whole series of important tasks in our body. They have important functions in the immune system, regulate the fat, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, promote nutrient uptake and blood formation and also serve as radical scavengers. In addition, B vitamins make sure our nervous system works properly and our skin, nails and hair stay healthy.

Read more: What do you need Vitamin B for?

   

Is the "normal" diet sufficient to provide enough vitamin B?

Normally yes. Those who eat healthy and varied, is usually supplied with all the important B vitamins. However, there are certain factors and life situations that may require an increased need for vitamins and may promote vitamin B deficiency.

Read more: Is the "normal" diet sufficient to provide enough vitamin B?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B?

B vitamins are found in both plant and animal foods. Only vitamin B12 is an exception, because it occurs almost exclusively in animal products.

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B?

   

What are the symptoms of vitamin B deficiency?

Lack of concentration, hair loss or poor wound healing can be signs of vitamin B deficiency. In addition, the following additional symptoms may be added:

Read more: What are the symptoms of vitamin B deficiency?

   

What does the body need vitamin B1 (thiamine) for?

Thiamine or vitamin B1 is important for a well-functioning nervous system. The water-soluble vitamin affects both the peripheral and the central nervous system. It is mainly responsible for the transmission of stimulus of the muscles and the nerves. In addition, vitamin B1 influences the metabolism of some neurotransmitters and ensures, for example, that we can sufficiently recover after illnesses or after stressful and stressful situations.

Read more: What does the body need vitamin B1 (thiamine) for?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B1 (thiamine)?

The following foods are particularly rich in vitamin B1:

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B1 (thiamine)?

   

What are the symptoms of vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency?

Thiamin is especially important for the energy production of the body - so for the carbohydrate metabolism. A vitamin B1 deficiency is therefore often expressed by fatigue or physical and mental weakness. Since thiamine also has an important effect on our nervous system, a lack of vitamin B1 can lead to memory loss and nerve damage. In the worst case, a pronounced and persistent vitamin B1 deficiency can even trigger life-threatening conditions (Beri-Beri's disease).

Read more: What are the symptoms of vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency?

   

Vitamin B2: What is it important for, how do you recognize a deficiency?

What does the body need vitamin B2 (riboflavin) for?

Vitamin B2, also called riboflavin or lactoflavin, is needed in the body for numerous metabolic processes. It serves as a building block of various coenzymes:

  • Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)
  • Flavin mononucleotide (FMN, riboflavin phosphate)

Read more: Vitamin B2: What is it important for, how to recognize a deficiency?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B2 (riboflavin)?

Vitamin B2 is found in many different foods. The natural plant dye is found in both vegetable products (e.g., paprika, mushrooms and spinach) and animal products (such as milk, eggs, liver).

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B2 (riboflavin)?

   

Vitamin B3: What is important for it, how do you recognize a deficiency?

What does the body need vitamin B3 (niacin) for?

In the diet, vitamin B3 (niacin) exists in two different forms: nicotinic acid and nicotinamide.In the body, these two forms can be rebuilt into each other and serve together with other substances as co-enzymes (auxiliary molecule). As such, they regulate numerous metabolic processes in the body, such as protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism.

Read more: Vitamin B3: What is it important for, how to recognize a deficiency?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B3 (niacin, nicotinic acid)?

Animal foods such as meat, fish, dairy products and eggs are valuable vitamin B3 suppliers. On the other hand, herbal products contain only a small amount of niacin. In addition, vitamin B3 of plant origin is poorly absorbed by the body.

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B3 (niacin, nicotinic acid)?

   

What is the function of vitamin B4 (choline)?

Choline (formerly called vitamin B4) is a vitamin-like substance (vitaminoid) that can be produced by the organism itself and performs many important tasks in the body: Choline is involved in the metabolism of fats and proteins and contributes significantly to energy.

Read more: What is the function of vitamin B4 (choline)?

   

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid): What is important for it, how do you recognize a deficiency?

What does the body need vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) for?

Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) plays an important role in the metabolism of the body. It is specifically used to generate energy in the cells and is involved in countless up and down processes (such as the formation of connective tissue, cartilage and mucous membranes).

Read more: Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid): What is it important for, how do you recognize a deficiency?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)?

The name pantothenic acid is derived from the Greek word "pantothen", which translates to as much as "everywhere" means. This is to say that it is present in bound form as part of coenzyme A in almost all foods.

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)?

   

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): What is important for it, how to recognize a deficiency?

What does the body need for vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)?

Vitamin B6 is also called pyridoxine and, strictly speaking, it contains the substances pyridoxal and pyridoxamine. Vitamin B6 is involved in many metabolic processes in the body. For the most part, however, it is needed for the assembly and disassembly of amino acids (protein). Specifically, it accelerates the buildup of muscle protein and promotes fat burning.

Read more: Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): What is it important for, how to recognize a deficiency?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)?

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is found in many animal and plant foods. Especially rich in vitamin B6 are, for example:

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)?

   

Vitamin B7 (Biotin): What is it important for, how do you recognize a deficiency?

What does the body need vitamin B7 (biotin) for?

Vitamin B7 or biotin is involved in many processes in the metabolism. It affects the carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism and is important for the formation of fatty acids. In addition, it has a positive effect on the cholesterol level (increases the "good" HDL cholesterol and lowers the "bad" LDL cholesterol).

Read more: Vitamin B7 (biotin): What is it important for, how do you recognize a deficiency?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B7 (biotin)?

Biotin (Vitamin B7, Vitamin H) is contained in almost all foods. However, many foods (especially herbal products) have a very low concentration of the vitamin. Larger amounts of biotin are among others in:

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B7 (biotin)?

   

Vitamin B9 (folic acid): what is important for it, how to recognize a deficiency?

What does the body need vitamin B9 (folic acid) for?

Vitamin B9 or folic acid (more rarely called vitamin B11 or vitamin M) is involved in cell division and cell regeneration. Thus, it plays an essential role in the entire cell metabolism and is especially for blood formation (for the production of red and white blood cells) and for the production of platelets - which are necessary for the wound closure - indispensable. In addition, the vitamin is important for the production of the genetic material (DNA synthesis) and protein metabolism.

Read more: Vitamin B9 (folic acid): What is it important for, how do you recognize a deficiency?

   

Vitamin B12: What is it important for, how do you recognize a deficiency?

What does the body need vitamin B12 (cobalamin) for?

Vitamin B12 is a generic name for various compounds that contain cobalt and have a similar effect in the body.The vitamin plays a central role in many different metabolic processes (and thus in energy production) in the body (especially in fat metabolism). It promotes the formation of red blood cells and hormone production.

Read more: Vitamin B12: What is it important for, how do you recognize a deficiency?

   

Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B12 (cobalamin)?

Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) occurs almost exclusively in animal foods. Significant sources of vitamin B12 are meat, fish, eggs, dairy and milk products. But also vegetable products (fermented foods) such as sauerkraut, beer or the Chlorella algae contain vitamin B12 - albeit only in very low concentrations.

Read more: Which foods contain a lot of vitamin B12 (cobalamin)?

   

Where and how does vitamin D arise in the body?

The vitamin D that we produce is produced primarily in our skin. Under the influence of sunlight. But until the vitamin works, it goes through several stages of chemical development. How it works is complicated and confusing. But we'll try it.

Read more: Where and how is vitamin D produced in the body?

   

Why is vitamin D actually a hormone?

Because vitamin D can also be produced by the body and acts in the same way as a hormone. In fact, the term vitamin D is misleading. Because as vitamins substances are defined that are vital for the body, but can not be produced by the body itself.

Read more: Why is vitamin D actually a hormone?

   

How much vitamin D do we need?

The recommendations for vitamin D care are different worldwide and controversial in the expert scene. In Germany, people like to refer to the recommendations of the German Society for Nutrition (DGE) when it comes to official statements. But even this society is not immune from misjudgments.

Read more: How much vitamin D do we need?

   

Can you meet your dietary vitamin D needs?

Vitamin D is not that easy. The usual and very justified indication of a healthy and balanced diet is not enough here. All in all, our usual foods do not contain the quantities that could completely cover the demand.

Read more: Can you meet your dietary vitamin D needs?

   

Why does the vitamin D requirement increase with age?

In old age, the ability of the skin to produce vitamin D diminishes under the influence of sunlight. At 80, this capacity is only a quarter of that of a 20-year-old.

Read more: Why does vitamin D demand increase with age?

   

How much vitamin D do we normally take each day?

We receive our daily vitamin dose via the body's own production (under the influence of sunlight or daylight) and through the diet. The individual amount depends on many factors. For example, the latitude of our place of residence, our skin type, the season, our outdoor behavior, and other variables.

Read more: How much vitamin D do we normally take each day?

   

How much sun covers the need for vitamin D?

Fair-skinned people will need about 12 minutes of intense sunbathing at an early age for adequate supply of vitamin D3. During this period, the body uses the UVB portion of the sun's rays to produce 250-500 μg or 10,000-20,000 IU of the hormone-like vitamin.

Read more: How much sun covers the need for vitamin D?

   

What influence does vitamin D have on genes?

Vitamin D exerts its effect by affecting the DNA in the nucleus. Although this does not change the genes in the strict sense, it ensures that the desired proteins are produced via the DNA contact. Namely, those that stabilize the bone and strengthen the immune system - to name only the most important tasks of vitamin D.

Read more: What influence does vitamin D have on genes?

   

Is overdose with vitamin D possible?

An overdose of vitamin D is possible in principle, but nowadays unlikely. In adults, acute intoxication can only be expected with a single dose of 50 mg (2 million IU) or more. And you can hardly take such a dose by accident.

Read more: Is an overdose with vitamin D possible?

   

What forms of vitamin D are there?

Vitamin D does not stand for a single substance, but is a collective term for various precursors and molecule versions. Before the vitamin is good for our health, it goes through several stages of development in the body. As if that were not complicated enough, all those precursors have scary bulky names.In other words, the following is only suitable for hard guys.

Read more: What forms of vitamin D are there?

   

Can the skin also produce vitamin D in winter?

It's difficult in our latitudes. Crucial for the human photosynthesis process for the formation of vitamin D is precisely the otherwise so dreaded UVB content of solar radiation. Therefore, the position of the sun or the light intensity play an important role - the higher, the better.

Read more: Can the skin also form vitamin D in winter?

   

Is vitamin D production dependent on skin type?

Yes. Dark-skinned people need more sunshine or a longer stay in sunlight than fair-skinned people to produce vitamin D. The reason is the higher content of melanin in their skin. This ensures a stronger absorption of UV radiation. And the UV radiation of the sun is necessary for the photochemical synthesis of vitamin D3 in the skin.

Read more: Is vitamin D production dependent on skin type?

   

What levels of vitamin D in the blood are normal?

To assess the vitamin D supply of the body, a precursor of the vitamin in the blood is measured: Calcidiol or vitamin D3 (25-hydroxy vitamin D3). If one follows the recommendations of the Robert Koch Institute, the blood level of vitamin D3 must not be below 20 ng / ml (50 nmol / l).

Read more: What levels of vitamin D in the blood are normal?

   

What is 25-hydroxy-vitamin-D3?

A precursor of vitamin D. The term vitamin D does not stand for a single substance, but for several. A precursor of the biologically active vitamin D3 is calcidiol, which is often referred to as 25-hydroxy-vitamin-D3.

Read more: What is 25-hydroxy-vitamin-D3?

   

Vitamin D deficiency is common

Vitamin D is commonly referred to as "sun vitamin". As a "bone vitamin", vitamin D was underestimated for a long time.

Read more: Vitamin D deficiency is widespread

   

What is special about the vitamin supplement Vitamin B-Logs completely?

Vitamin B-Loges® completely contains all eight B vitamins (B1, B2, B6, B12, folic acid, niacin, pantothenic acid and biotin), in a particularly well usable for the body shape. Folic acid is in the form of 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, vitamin B12 in the form of methylcobalamin. Both substances are needed for the methionine synthase, by helping to reduce the harmful metabolite homocysteine, which is associated with atherosclerosis, heart attack, stroke and dementia.

Read more: What is special about the vitamin supplement Vitamin B-Logs completely?

   

Vitamin B logs complete: are side effects possible?

The tablets are usually well tolerated. In healthy people, no side effects are to be expected, even with a long-term use.

Background: Vitamin B-Loges® completely contains all eight B vitamins and also the three vitaminoids choline, Pangamic acid and inositol, which were previously counted as a vitamin. The 11 vital substances supplement and support each other in their effects and are especially important for the energy metabolism and a well-functioning immune and nervous system.

Read more: Vitamin B logs complete: Are side effects possible?

   

What is the role of vitamin D?

Vitamin D is a key substance for our organism. Best known and best researched so far is its importance for the calcium balance and bone metabolism. In conjunction with other signaling substances such as the parathyroid hormone, it ensures that calcium and phosphate, but also magnesium, are absorbed sufficiently in the small intestine and are available to the body. For example, the structure, density and hardness of our bones depend on it.

Read more: What is the role of vitamin D?

   

Does vitamin D protect you from cancer?

Numerous scientific studies now speak for a protective effect of vitamin D against cancer. At least, conspicuously low levels of vitamin D have been detected in more than a dozen different cancers. And in some cases, positive effects of appropriate vitamin D supplements.

Read more: Does Vitamin D Protect Against Cancer?

   

Does vitamin D protect against heart attacks?

This is supported by extensive scientific surveys. In a large long-term study, men between the ages of 40 and 75 years were observed. Those with vitamin D deficiency have a nearly two-and-a-half-fold risk of developing a heart attack over the next 10 years.

Read more: Does Vitamin D Protect Against Heart Attack?

   

Do you get enough Vitamin D as a vegetarian?

That is at least questionable. To take enough vitamin D as a vegetarian, you have to pay more attention than meat eaters. Because in most plants, no or hardly any vitamin D is present.

Read more: Do you as a vegetarian get enough Vitamin D?

   

Is cod liver oil still a good vitamin D supplier?

With the keyword vitamin D, many older adults still use cod liver oil as a source of nutrition. Previously, children who eat cod liver oil are reliably protected from the bone disease rickets. Because rickets caused by vitamin D deficiency. But times have changed and cod liver oil, as a recommended supplier of vitamin D, no longer plays the same role as before.

Read more: Is cod liver oil still a good vitamin D supplier?

   

When is a vitamin D deficiency present?

The currently best, but almost the only, early indication of a vitamin D deficiency is too low a blood count. For this purpose, a precursor of vitamin D must be determined in the blood serum, the 25-OH-vitamin-D3. That is still consensus in the scientific and health expert group of experts.

Read more: When is a vitamin D deficiency present?

   

Do we really have a vitamin D deficiency?

Yes. At least on average. This finding was reached in 2012 by the Berlin-based Robert Koch Institute (RKI), the most important federal institute in the field of disease surveillance and prevention.

Read more: Do we really have a vitamin D deficiency?

   

Why does a strong overweight lead to vitamin D deficiency?

On average, obese people have less vitamin D in their blood than their normal-weight counterparts. That's what studies have shown. Vitamin D is known to be liposoluble and is stored in adipose tissue. Some scientists now assume that there is more or less "imprisoned" in overweight people and is no longer fully available for the body cycle.

Read more: Why does a strong overweight lead to vitamin D deficiency?

   

How Does Taking Vitamin D Tablets Change Blood Levels?

Not only are more and more health-interested people asking this question, but many doctors are asking themselves as well. A rough rule of thumb for this is: A single dose of 10,000 IU of vitamin D3 increases the serum level by about 1 ng / ml in a 70 kg adult. And of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3, this is the vitamin D precursor that can be measured in the blood.

Read more: How Does Taking Vitamin D Tablets Change Blood Levels?

   

For whom is vitamin D-loges suitable?

In principle for the whole family. If you have opted for an extra dose of vitamin D, the dietary supplement vtamin D-loges® 5,600 I.E. recommended to all, except babies. The intake takes place weekly, preferably in the context of a main meal.

Read more: For whom is vitamin D-loges suitable?

   

Why do you only need to take vitamin D logs once a week?

Because it covers the daily needs for the next seven days. The dosage of one tablet (gel tab) vitamin D-loges® corresponds to the necessary weekly ration of vitamin D prescribed by the German Nutrition Society. Exact are in the vitamin supplement 140 μg or 5,600 International Units (IU) of vitamin D.

Read more: Why do you only need to take vitamin D logs once a week?

   

What side effects can occur with vitamin D log?

The recommended consumption of one tablet per week is with no side effects of vitamin D-loges® 5,600 I.E. to count. Also, an overdose, which is in principle possible when taking this fat-soluble vitamin. is with vitamin D log® not to be afraid. The tolerance range is usually quite high.

Read more: What side effects can occur with vitamin D logs?

   

Where do you get vitamin D logs and what does it cost?

The dietary supplement vitamin D-loges® 5,600 I.E. is available in the pharmacy or via a pharmacy-based online shop on the Internet. The suggested retail price is 11.50 € for a pack of 15 gel tabs and 19.90 € for 30 gel tabs.

Read more: Where do you get vitamin D logs and what does it cost?

   

What exactly is included in vitamin D logs?

The dietary supplement vitamin D-loges® 5,600 I.E. serves to supply vitamin D3. Each gel tab of the drug contains the vital substance in the amount recommended by the German Nutrition Society, based on 7 days. Because vitamin D-loges is taken only once a week.

Read more: What exactly is contained in Vitamin D-Logs?

   

Vitamin D-loges: Why does the pack look so oily after opening?

That's the way it is. In the gel tabs, vitamin D is embedded in sunflower oil because it improves intestinal uptake. The oily impression after opening the blister (these are the small individual subjects in the tablet pack) is therefore a quality feature and not a sign of lack or corruption.

Read more: Vitamin D-loges: Why does the pack look so oily after opening?