Cold: self-help and treatment

How is a cold treated?

Despite the fantastic possibilities of modern medicine in other fields, the doctor is largely powerless with a banal cold. This is similar to the moon flight and the cling film, which almost never breaks down in the 21st century: the easier, the more difficult.

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What can I do for my child with a cold?

A cold can not be cured from the outside, this makes the body of your child itself. However, you can make the best possible conditions for this healing process and provide relief from the often annoying cold symptoms. The following tips should help you:

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Which medicines are helpful for a cold?

In the case of a cold, medication is unnecessary in most cases. If TV commercials tell you something different, never forget that someone here primarily wants to make money. However, we do not want to vilify drugs here either. In individual cases, they can of course very well alleviate the symptoms.

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Cold in children: How to clear the nose?

That's the thing with the whining of children. Either they can not or they do not want. Infants and young children are not anatomically so far as to actively blow the nose free. And later on, it may be physical, but there is hardly a child in the mood for thorough gagging.

Read more: Cold in children: How do you get your nose free?

   

Cold in the baby: How do I clear the stuffy nose?

Especially with colds, your offspring, as with all diseases with increased mucus formation, should receive much to drink. If you are (still) breast-feeding, you can use your breastmilk as the best medicine to clear your baby's stuffy nose soon: Before each breastfeeding, spread some milk from your chest onto a teaspoon and drip a few drops into your baby of it in every nostril. Sounds strange, but it helps.

Read more: Runny nose with the baby: How do I clear the stuffy nose?

   

Avoid colds on milk and dairy products - is that true?

It is a well-known assumption that milk and dairy products promote mucilage and are therefore rather unfavorable to a cold - but it is not scientifically proven. So there is no reason to push through a strict milk ban.

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Is cough syrup useful for a common cold?

No. In case of a common cold, the use of cough syrup is neither sensible nor effective, since the disease and thus also the cause of the cough only occur in the upper part of the respiratory tract. The cough here has a cleansing function that should not be hindered from the outside.

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How does a rising foot bath work?

In the early stages of a cold, a rising foot bath is sometimes recommended as an extremely effective remedy. In children, this home remedy comes from the 6th month of age into consideration. To do this, proceed as follows:

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Are nose drops useful to prevent sinusitis or middle ear infection?

Some doctors recommend decongestant nasal drops as a treatment for children who have a cold and are prone to sinus or middle ear infections. This is to ensure the ventilation of the paranasal sinuses or the middle ear and inflammation can be prevented.

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What to do if the healing tea does not taste the child?

Teas from medicinal herbs can often contribute to the recovery of a sick child.But only if they are drunk. Unfortunately, this often fails because of the lack of happiness of the child's sensory and taste cells.

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Can I also give my child nose drops for adults?

This is not advised, rather use the products that are made especially for children and newborns. Overall, you should apply decongestant nose drops as rarely and briefly (a few days) as possible, as they can damage the nose peel after prolonged use.

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Are nose drops dangerous for children?

That depends on the nasal spray. If you use nasal sprays that are based on a constriction of the blood vessels in the nose (active ingredients: oxymetazoline, xylometazoline, tramazoline, naphazoline), then on the one hand you should only use preparations especially for children, and no longer than a few days.

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What brings the rubbing in with colds - and what is to be considered in children?

Breast rubbing with bronchial balm or essential oils not only brings relief to the bronchial tubes but also helps your child feel better. The volatile (ethereal) active ingredients are inhaled with every breath and can unfold their anti-inflammatory and relaxing effect in the disease-plagued body.

Read more: What is the effect of rubbing in colds - and what is important for children?

   

Should my child stay home for a cold?

Whether you should allow your chilled child to move out of the home depends on his or her general condition. If he just sniffs or coughs without feeling unwell, fresh air and exercise (without overexertion and sweating!) Will do him good.

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When do you have to go to the doctor for a cold?

In most cases, parents can easily detect a common cold in their child by the usual symptoms. And the common cold is not a reason to go to the doctor if you have no doubt about your (own) diagnosis and know how to help your child.

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How do I make nasal drops myself?

Nasal drops based on saline are recommended for gentle treatment of the swollen nasal mucous membranes. This applies to your baby or your child, but it also applies to you. And as follows, you can make such a rinse solution yourself:

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Should be treated with purulent snot with antibiotics?

No, this common assumption lacks the scientific basis. What the snuff (or "snot") looks like, what consistency and what color it has does not say anything about whether bacteria are behind it. And only then would antibiotics be appropriate, because against the common cold viruses they can not do anything.

Read more: Must be treated with purulent rotten with antibiotics?