Cataract: Operation

How is a cataract operation going? How dangerous is the procedure? More in this chapter.

When should a cataract be operated on?

Normally you decide when the right time for a cataract operation is over. The only exception is that your cataract has progressed so far that the lack of vision endangers your own safety and that of others.

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Cataract: How well can I see after surgery?

The prospects are in the truest sense of the word good. 90% of the operated patients have significantly better eyesight after the procedure. The view is again largely clear, sharper and more contrasty, the colors shine again, the overall optical quality is improved.

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Cataract: How is the operation going and how long does it take?

Most cataract operations are performed on an outpatient basis in the office or clinic. Inpatient admission to the hospital is usually only required if comorbidities on the eye complicate the procedure or surgery under general anesthesia.

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Is the cataract surgery painful?

Normally, cataract surgery should not cause significant pain. Therefore, the procedure is not performed under general anesthesia, unless other reasons require it or you necessarily want it.

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How many times do you have to go to the doctor after a cataract operation?

As a treatment after the cataract surgery you will usually receive eye drops to promote the healing process. The active ingredients contained are directed against an internal inflammation and against a bacterial infection (antibiotic) of the operated eye.

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Cataracts: What should I consider after the operation?

Ask someone to pick you up before surgery. As a freshly operated star patient, driving for you is ruled out. The ophthalmologist will have discussed with you the aftercare and the need for care after the surgery (hopefully) beforehand.

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What are the risks and side effects of cataract surgery?

Posterior chamber lens Posterior chamber lens The good news: The Star operation is one of the most frequently performed operations in Germany. Accordingly high are usually the standards. The complication rate is less than 2%.

The most serious, but extremely rare, complication is severe bleeding or infection inside the operated eye. In addition, as with any surgery, there are a few more risks and complications.

Read more: What are the risks and side effects of cataract surgery?

   

Can I have something to eat before the cataract operation?

This depends, among other things, on the chosen anesthetic procedure and should be discussed with you by the anesthetist in advance of the operation. Usually, you can eat up to six hours before the procedure and eat a clear liquid, say tea or water, up to two hours before. Not allowed are milk, yogurt or soup.

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What anesthetic options are there in the star operation?

If you are afraid of getting anesthetized, you are not alone. Many people are worried about the use of the anesthetic injection. This is the same with the dentist and with the eye surgeon.

Read more: What anesthetic options are available for star surgery?

   

Do I have to stop my blood thinner (for example Marcumar) from staring?

It depends on the stunning method. In the case of drip anesthesia, where the anesthetic is applied to the eye from the outside in drops or gels, you can usually continue to take your blood-thinning medication as usual.

Read more: Do I have to stop my blood thinner (for example Marcumar) from staring?

   

Cataract: What is a phacoemulsification?

Although the word is hardly pronounceable and sounds relatively exotic, it is one of the most common surgical procedures ever: the lens removal for the treatment of cataracts using an ultrasound technique.

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